14-12-2020

Spike is the key to infection

 

In a special notice form August 11, 2020, concerning COVID-19, the University of California San Francisco explains how the virus proceeds to infiltrate the human organism.


SARS-CoV-2 relies on its so-called spike proteins to infect cells. These spikes stud the surface of the virus and impart a crown-like appearance when viewed through an electron microscope – hence the name ‘coronavirus’ for the viral family, including SARS-CoV-2. Spikes, however, are more than a mere decoration – they are the essential key that allows the virus to enter our cells.


Like a retractable tool, spikes can switch from a closed, inactive state to an open, active state. When any of a virus particle’s approximately 25 spikes become active, that spike’s three “receptor-binding domains,” or RBDs, become exposed and are primed to attach to ACE2 (pronounced “ace two”), a receptor found on human cells that line the lung and airway.
Through a lock-and-key-like interaction between an ACE2 receptor and a spike RBD, the virus gains entry into the cell, where it then transforms its new host into a coronavirus manufacturer.


With AM-301, Altamira medica is developing a drug-free, natural protection to reinforce our nasal mucosal defences to prevent the virus from entering the human organism and docking to the cells with its spikes.

 

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